Amman • Jordan: Blue Mosque - a place of Faith and History

The Blue Mosque, also known as the King Abdullah I Mosque, is one of the most iconic religious buildings in Amman, the capital of Jordan. Built between 1982 and 1989, it bears the name of King Abdullah I, grandfather of the current king, and was erected on the presumed location of the latter's tomb. 

The Blue Mosque is distinguished by its magnificent architecture which combines elements of Ottoman, Arabic and Persian Islamic traditions. Its main dome is covered with blue tiles, hence its nickname "Blue Mosque". The interior is equally impressive, with Islamic calligraphy adorning the walls, colorful stained glass windows and an intricately carved wooden minbar (pulpit). 

One of the remarkable aspects of the Blue Mosque is that it is one of the few mosques in Jordan open to non-Muslims. This makes it an important place for interreligious dialogue and a popular tourist site for visitors who wish to learn more about Islam and Jordanian culture. 

In short, the Blue Mosque in Amman is a symbol of contemporary Jordanian history, an architectural masterpiece, and a place of cultural and spiritual exchange.

Amman • Blue Mosque ( Jordan,  )

Amman • Blue Mosque

Amman • Blue Mosque ( Jordan,  )

Amman • Blue Mosque

Amman • Blue Mosque ( Jordan,  )

Amman • Blue Mosque

The Blue Mosque of Amman: a monument of spirituality and history 

 

One of the architectural gems of Amman, the capital of Jordan, is undoubtedly the Blue Mosque, officially known as the King Abdullah I Mosque. This impressive monument is not only an Islamic place of worship, but also a center of interfaith education and an important historical landmark. 

 

A tribute to the founder of the kingdom 

 

The process of building the Blue Mosque began in 1982 and was completed in 1989. The name of the mosque is a tribute to King Abdullah I, the founder of the modern Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan and grandfather of the current King, Abdullah II. The mosque was erected on the presumed site of the tomb of King Abdullah I, thus giving this building greater cultural and historical significance. 

 

A fusion of architectural influences 

 

One of the most remarkable aspects of the Blue Mosque is its distinctive architecture, which blends elements from different Islamic traditions. The building was designed to reflect the region's rich Ottoman, Arab and Persian heritage. The main dome, adorned with vibrant blue tiles, has earned the mosque its nickname "Blue Mosque". The entire exterior is a harmonious blend of white stones and golden brass details, illustrating exquisite craftsmanship. 

 

A dazzling interior 

 

The interior of the mosque is equally impressive. The walls are decorated with Islamic calligraphy, executed by local artists, adding a spiritual and aesthetic dimension to the space. The multicolored stained glass windows diffuse a soft light inside, creating an atmosphere of serenity. The minbar (pulpit), precisely carved from high quality wood, is a work of art in itself. 

 

A center for interreligious dialogue 

 

The Blue Mosque is one of a kind in Jordan, as it allows entry to non-Muslims. This open welcome is a deliberate effort to encourage inter-religious dialogue and allow visitors to learn about Islam and Jordanian culture. With this in mind, the mosque serves not only as a place of prayer, but also as a cultural and educational center. 

 

In conclusion: more than a place of worship 

 

Amman's Blue Mosque transcends its role as a place of worship to become a living testimony to Jordan's contemporary history, an architectural masterpiece and a symbol of inter-religious coexistence and understanding. Through its existence and its mission, it illustrates the capacity of the Jordanian people to harmoniously merge various cultural and religious traditions.

The Blue Mosque of Amman: an architectural symphony 

 

The Blue Mosque of Amman, also known as the King Abdullah I Mosque, is an architectural marvel that stands out for its unique style and harmonious fusion of different Islamic traditions. Let's take a closer look at the main architectural features of this monument. 

 

External influence: a mixture of traditions 

 

The architecture of the Blue Mosque reflects a diverse range of influences. The building was designed to incorporate elements of Ottoman, Arab and Persian heritage, paying homage to the region's rich and diverse history. The choice of materials, mainly white stones, reinforces the link with local traditions, while the golden brass details add a touch of elegance and majesty. 

 

The dome: the crown jewel 

 

One of the most striking features of the mosque is its main dome, adorned with vibrant blue tiles, which has earned it its nickname "Blue Mosque". The dome, which stands proudly above the entire building, is a true architectural masterpiece that instantly captures the attention of visitors. 

 

The interior: a sanctuary of detail 

 

Inside the mosque, the attention to detail is striking. The walls are decorated with Islamic calligraphy, a traditional art that adds a spiritual and aesthetic dimension to the space. The multicolored stained glass windows, another striking feature, cast soft light inside, creating an atmosphere of serenity. 

 

The minbar (pulpit), another key element of the interior, is a work of art in itself. Carved with precision in high quality wood, it demonstrates the mastery of the craftsmen who worked on this project. 

 

In conclusion: an architectural masterpiece 

 

The Blue Mosque in Amman is an architectural masterpiece that embodies the harmonious fusion of different Islamic traditions and cultures. It stands out with its impressive exterior, iconic dome and intricately detailed interior, making this mosque a truly unique landmark in the Amman landscape.

Monument profile
Blue Mosque
Monument category: Mosque
Monument family: Mosque, Minaret or Madrasa
Monument genre: Religious
Cultural heritage: Islamic
Geographic location: Amman • Jordan
Construction period: 20th century AD

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